Rob Sowinski’s lighting is subtle but effective and vital to orienting the audience to where the characters are next.

Keith Gow, Keith Gow, Writer
26 January 2018

James Browne’s set and costume design, perfectly complemented by Rob Sowinski’s delicately detailed lighting design, is beautifully observed.

Clive Paget, Limelight
01 February 2017


Rob Sowinski’s lighting design helps place us in the story so we know if we are mired in the excess of the Kit Kat Klub or standing in the austere and small confines of Fraulein Schneider’s rooming-house.

Debbie Zhou, Aussie Theatre
06 February 2017


Through production designer James Browne, lighting designer Rob Sowinski and sound designers Nick Walker and Andrew Worboys, the tiny Hayes Theatre has been transformed into the seamy, dingy, exciting Kit Kat Club, a nitery that had no great days to look back on.

Diana Simmonds, Stage Noise
01 February 2017


Rob Sowinski’s lighting is fabulously effective, richly coloured but also shadowy and expressionistic

Tim Byrne, TimeOut
03 May 2017

“Rob Sowinski’s lighting heightens the emotional perspective without the need for superfluous physicality on stage.”

Maxim Boon, LimeLight
27 May 2016


“The inhospitable space is rendered warm and intriguing with an astute and delightful attention to detail. The lighting and costuming resist representing Crisp as spectral and allow all the beauty and the blemishes of the character to emanate from the stage. This is an exceptional piece of theatre, definitely not to be missed.”

Patricia De Risio, Stage Whispers
29 May 2016


“It is a gorgeous production, designed by Romanie Harper (costumes and set) and Rob Sowinski (lights) who provide us with all the visual cues necessary to imagine the decrepit bedroom in which Crisp dwelled, while creating a sense of decadent drama that befits our protagonist, and bringing to sharp focus the physical subject of this monologue presentation.”

Suzy Wong, Suzy Goes See
13 July 2016


“As deftly directed by Gary Abrahams, designed with flair by Romanie Harper, and with atmospheric lighting by Rob Sowinksi, this production sizzles. Capsis plays Crisp with panache and superb timing.”

Lynne Lancaster, Sydney Arts Guide
17 July 2016


“There’s a Gothic grubbiness to Gary Abrahams’ production from Romanie Harper’s costume and set design through to Rob Sowinski’s lighting, which is at times eerie and ethereal, the final cue quite startling.”

Richard Cotter, Australian Stage
14 July 2016


“Gary Abrahams’ directing must be given full credit here, as it must for the wonderfully/awfully grotty set design by Romanie Harper, the abstract half-threatening background sound by Daniel Nixon – fading and swelling with our feelings – and, especially I thought, for Rob Sowinski’s lighting which gave the small space a living dynamism as lights subtly took us to different places and different degrees of emphasis.”

Frank McKone, Canberra Critic's Circle
27 July 2016


“His performance is supported by Daniel Nixon’s subtle sound, Rob Sowinski’s lighting, quite gorgeous at times, and by Romanie Harper’s costumes and evocative set. “

Alanna McLean, Canberra Times
28 July 2016

“Rob Sowinski and Bryn Cullen’s lighting design adds immense depth to the stage, where despite the relatively small spaces in which scenes often play out, there is still a sense of the vast expanse of this world. Their play with shadows and darkness throughout builds on the intimacy of the play while heightening the melancholy, despair and fear that is felt by the characters.”

Myron My, My Melbourne Arts
07 September 2017


“...the set, sound, lighting and costume design unveil a surprising degree of spectacle”

Cameron Woodhead, Sydney Morning Herald
07 September 2017


“Rob Sowinski and Bryn Cullen’s lighting design is rich and multifaceted, directly invoking Kushner’s wish that the play reveal its theatrical hardware but still wow us with its effects.”

Time Out, Tim Byrne


Director Gary Abrahams and producer Cameron Lukey have assembled a creative team of truly top-notch calibre, who manage to deliver grandeur and dramatic clarity from seemingly slight resources.

the music.com.au, Maxim Boon
08 September 2017


The transformation of the fortyfive space to accommodate this vast and complex work is nothing short of jaw-dropping - and reason itself to witness the show. The creation of a cloud-like theatre-magic aesthetic that shapes itself to reveal whole worlds made for a clarity and excitement that could have been a complete confusion if not for the incredible work done by Dann Barber (Set/Costume), Rob Sowinski, Bryn Cullen (Lighting) and Benjamin Sheen (Assistant Set)

Broadway World Australia, Brodie Papparella
08 September 2017


Rob Sowinski and Bryn Cullen’s lighting design was gorgeously nostalgic, visibly populating the rig with enormous vintage fixtures and rusty old fluorescent batten fittings that flickered in supernatural moments. As a bit of a lighting nerd there were a few very covertly high-tech things about the design that blew me away – suffice it to say that it wouldn’t have been possible in the 90s but it does the work so much justice. 

Theatre People, Jai Leeworthy
12 September 2017


Gary Abraham’s assured direction was abetted by precise lighting and sound design.

The Guardian, Steve Dow
27 December 2017

Rob Sowinski’s set and lighting design is first rate. The oversized scale of certain props, a huge baby mobile with a Miro bent and a carpet covered womb – shaped rise, allow the actors a surreal twist of overwhelm.  If this decision is deliberate, it is an intelligent move.

Nick Pilgrim, Theatre People
31 October 2016

“...simple, yet beautifully executed set and lighting design by Rob Sowinski make the technical aspects of this production top class.”

Adam Rafferty, Theatrepeople
24 January 2016


“The cleverly nuanced lighting design, supported by Russell Goldsmith’s subtle soundscapes, also helps delineate the shifting locations as the narrative skips forward and back through time.”

Maxim Boon, Limelight
21 January 2016


“the design elements – including a fractured streetscape by Rob Sowinski, dislocated from its rightful place and time and artfully lit…are beautifully integrated into the production.” 

Richard Watts, Arts Hub
21 January 2016

“Rob Sowinski’s tenderly atmospheric lighting design is a knockout.”

Paul Selar, Aussie Theatre
19 September 2015


“Rob Sowinski’s lighting is warmly complimentary, and helps augment the musical’s more humanist tendencies. The colour palette of cobalts and teals is a world away from the steel and glass of the original, and adds a welcome layer of geniality to the sometimes icy exchanges.”

Tim Byrne, Australian Book Review
18 September 2015


“Lighting Design by Rob Sowinski is emotive and complements the blue-green tones of Teh’s set nicely.”

Adam Rafferty, Theatrepeople
20 September 2015

“Rob Sowinski delighted us with a rich and subtle lighting of Mattea Davies’s beautiful painted set evoking a washed, bleached and windswept Beaumaris beachscape.”

David Barmby, Artshub
29 September 2015

“But great scripts need equally great creatives. There’s a design (Eugyeene Teh) that makes old warehouse offices feel like they were built for this play; lighting (Rob Sowinski) that builds as much tension as the script”

Anne-Marie Peard, Aussie Theatre

“I love that designer Eugyeene Teh has made another corner of this warehouse inseparable from this work and that he uses carpet squares. I love that Rob Sowinski’s lighting and Russell Goldsmith’s sound are such a part of the story telling.”

Anne-Marie Peard, Aussie Theatre


“Almost every element in Tanya Dickson’s production is cleverly realised: the statuesque use of space, the expressionist shadowplay of Rob Sowinski’s lighting, and performances that rove from camp drollery to discomforting intensity.”

Cameron Woodhead, The Age


“Triangle has been refined through input from an inspired and inspiring team.  There is hardly a hair out of place.  Sound (Russell Goldsmith and Chris Wenn) underpins the atmosphere and light (Rob Sowinski) mostly elucidates but some times endows the whole with a sense of question. ”

Susan Sandow, Stage Whispers